Category Archives: Call for Papers

CfP Volume 2 of Psychology from the Margins

The journal Psychology from the Margins, a student initiative that released its first volume in 2018 has released a call for papers for its second volume. Graduate or undergraduate students looking for an outlet for their historical work are encouraged to apply!

Psychology from the Margins is a student-run, student-led, peer-reviewed journal. This journal features scholarly work addressing the history of research, practice, and advocacy in psychology, especially in areas related to social justice, social issues, and social change. Its purpose is to help fill gaps in the historical literature by providing an outlet for articles in the history of psychology highlighting stories that have been unrepresented or underrepresented by other historical narratives.

Here is the link to the first issue:  http://ideaexchange.uakron.edu/psychologyfromthemargins/

The deadline for submission for the second volume is March 20th, 2019. Please see the journal webpage for more information about submission.

CfP 51st Annual Meeting of Cheiron, June 20-23, 2019 in Edmonton

Sara Igo

The call for papers for the 51st annual meeting of Cheiron has been released. The Scarborough Lecture will be delivered by Sarah Igo of Vanderbilt University. Full details follow below and can be found on the Cheiron website.

Call for Papers: 51st Annual Meeting of Cheiron: The International Society for the History of Behavioral and Social Sciences

Conference Date: June 20-23, 2019

Conference Location: MacEwan University, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Submission Due Date: January 15, 2019, 5pm EST

Email submissions to the Program Chair, Phyllis Wentworth, wentworthp@wit.edu

Websitehttp://www.bcp.psych.ualberta.ca/~mike/Cheiron/

Keynote address: Sarah Igo, Associate Professor of History and Director of the Program in American Studies at Vanderbilt University, will deliver the Scarborough Lecture. 

Papers, posters, symposia/panels, or workshops are invited for the 51st annual meeting of Cheiron: The International Society for the History of Behavioral and Social Sciences. We welcome submissions on any aspect of the history of the human, behavioral, and social sciences or related historiographical and methodological issues (see guidelines below). 

The conference will be held at MacEwan UniversityEdmontonAlberta, Canada, with Nancy Digdon as local host. MacEwan is located in downtown Edmonton (metro population about 1 million). We acknowledge that the land on which we meet in Treaty Six Territory is the traditional gathering place for many Indigenous people. We honour and respect the history, languages, ceremonies and culture of the First Nations, Métis and Inuit who call this territory home. 

MacEwan University is approximately 35 minutes from the Edmonton International Airport (YEG). Ground transportation at the airport includes shuttles, taxis, car rentals and Edmonton Transit (bus to train). Conference attendees will have the option to stay in MacEwan dorm rooms (equipped with towels and linens) or nearby hotels.

ABSTRACT SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

All papers, posters, and proposed symposia/panels should focus on new and original work, i.e. the main part of the work should not have been published or presented previously at other conferences. 

To facilitate the peer review and planning process, please provide a separate page that includes: a) title; b) author’s name and affiliation; c) author’s mail and email address and phone number; d) audio/visual needs. In all types of proposals below, names of authors/presenters should not be indicated anywhere but on the separate cover page for the submission.

Papers: Submit a 700-800 word abstract plus references that contains the major sources that inform your work. Presentations should be 20-25 minutes in length.

Posters: Submit a 300-400 word abstract plus references that contains the major sources that inform your work. 

Symposia/Panels: Organizer should submit a 250-300 word abstract describing the symposium as a whole and a list of the names and affiliations of the participants. Each participant should submit a 300-600 word abstract plus references that contains the major sources that inform your work. 

Workshops: Organizer should submit a 250-300 word abstract describing the workshop and, if applicable, a list of the names and affiliations of those participating.

 TRAVEL STIPENDS AND YOUNG SCHOLAR AWARD

 Travel StipendsCheiron will make funds available to help defray travel expenses for students, as well as other scholars facing financial hardship, who present at the conference. We encourage everyone to apply for support from their home institutions. The Travel Stipend is limited to $100 to $300 per accepted submission; co-authored presentations must be divided among the presenters. If you wish to be considered for the Stipend, please apply by sending the Program Chair a separate email message, explaining your status, at the same time that you submit your proposal.

 Young Scholar Award: Since 2008, Cheiron has awarded a prize for the best paper or symposium presentation by a young scholar. To be eligible for consideration, the young scholar must be the sole or first author on the paper and must be responsible for the bulk of the work of the paper. The young scholar must be a student currently or must have completed doctoral work not more than 5 years prior to the meeting.

About three weeks after the meeting, applicants for this award will submit a copy of the presented paper (rather than the abstract); it may include further, minor changes. Submissions go to the Cheiron Executive Officer, who sets the exact deadline, and the entries will be judged by members of the Program Committee and the Review Committee. The winner will receive a certificate from Cheiron and will be asked to submit the paper to the Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences within a reasonable period of time. The Award winner may ask Cheiron for assistance in preparing the paper for submission to JHBS. If the paper is accepted by JHBS for publication, the winner will receive a $500 honorarium from the publisher, Wiley-Blackwell, in recognition of the Cheiron Young Scholar Award. Please note that the award committee may choose not to grant an award in any given year and that the honorarium depends on publication in JHBS, in addition to winning the Award.

CfP: History of Emotions in the Modern Period

History of Psychology invites submissions for a special issue on the history of emotions in the modern period.

The relatively new specialization of the history of the emotions has revealed that emotion, felt experience, and expression have played a key role in culture, society, and politics. In the history of science, however, interest in the emotions has been more muted. This special issue will focus on the exploration of emotion theory and practice in the human sciences in the modern period – roughly from the late 18thcentury to today.

This special issue will address the following themes, among others. Was there a particular historical moment in which interest in emotions in the sciences, broadly construed, increased? While some historians situate heightened study of the emotions in the sciences in the 1960s, others point to a surge in interest in emotions after World War II. But we can also go back to William James’s 1884 influential theory of emotion that stimulated intense debate; or to the 1910s, when Walter Cannon experimented on the physiological concomitants of emotion; or to the early 1920s, when unorthodox psychoanalysts Sandor Ferenczi and Otto Rank raised emotional understanding to a central place in psychoanalysis. More recently, studies in the new discipline of social neuroscience have contributed to the ever-growing literature on emotion and the brain.

Can we discover the roots of the academy’s recent turn to the emotions in older traditions that have not yet received their due? Might historical investigations shed light on contemporary debates on emotion including the existence, or not, of a set of universal, basic emotions, or whether emotion is primarily a bodily affect or a cognitive response?

As the study of emotion has not been confined to any one discipline, we welcome submissions on the history of psychology, psychotherapy, neuroscience, psychophysiology, social work or other relevant fields.

The submission deadline is March 1, 2019.

The main text of each manuscript, exclusive of ?gures, tables, references, or appendices, should not exceed 35 double-spaced pages (approximately 7,500 words). Initial inquiries regarding the special issue may be sent to the guest editor, Susan Lanzoni <smlanzoni@gmail.com>or the regular editor, Nadine Weidman <hop.editor@icloud.com>.

Papers should be submitted through the History of Psychology Manuscript Submission Portal with a cover letter indicating that the paper is to be considered for the special issue. Please see the Instructions to Authors information located on the History of Psychology website.

CfP: 50 Years Since Stonewall, The Science and Politics of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity

American Psychologist invites submissions for a special issue on psychology’s contributions to understanding sexual orientation and gender diversity through research, policy, and activism.

Important Dates
  • Submission Deadline for 2-Page Letter of Intent: November 20, 2018
  • Full-Length Manuscript Submission Invitations Sent: December 20, 2018
  • Submission Deadline for Complete Manuscripts: March 20, 2019
Special Issue Aims

The goal of this special issue is to stimulate scholarly reflection on how psychology — through both research and policy influence — has been entangled with changing social and scientific attitudes and theories about sexual orientation and gender diversity over the past 50 years.

The history of psychology and the history of recent LGBTI activism have only recently begun to be co-narrated.

This aim of this issue is to analyze and explore the co-constitutive relationships between psychological research on gender diversity and sexual orientation and the society in which this research has been, and is, embedded, both in the United States and other national contexts.

Broad questions of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • How has the “science of sexual orientation” changed and been drawn upon in tandem with efforts to combat homophobia and cultural heterosexism?
  • How have efforts to develop LGBTQ-affirmative psychologies developed in national contexts outside the United States and transnationally?
  • How has psychological science been used to influence mental health policy, legal rulings, and social attitudes about same-sex marriage, gay parenting, trans-rights?
  • How has psychology’s engagement with sexual orientation and gender diversity intersected with its engagement with other movements for equality and social justice?

All manuscripts should explicitly discuss psychology’s contributions to our understanding of the issues being investigated, and should address the importance of the historical, social, political, intellectual, and/or institutional contexts in which these contributions have developed.

The journal has “an outstanding reputation as a primary means by which the contributions of psychologists are communicated to psychologists, to other professionals, and to the public” (Kazak, 2016, p. 1).

Manuscript Submission

Submission deadline for a 2-page letter of intent for the special issue is November 20, 2018.

The letter of intent should include author names and affiliations, manuscript title, and an abstract that outlines the proposed submission.

Abstracts should clearly convey how the proposed manuscript will address the goals of the special issue.

Alexandra Rutherford, PhD, Associate Editor, and Peter Hegarty, PhD, will serve as Guest Editors of the Special Issue, with Anne E. Kazak, PhD, as advisory editor.

Letters of intent and any questions should be sent to Alexandra Rutherford.

Manuscripts must be prepared according to the manuscript submission information available on the American Psychologist homepage and submitted electronically through the journal’s manuscript submission portal.

Call for Papers! Living Well: Histories of Emotions, Wellness & Human Flourishing

AHP readers may be interested in a just released call for papers for a special issue of the Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences:

CFP: Living Well: Histories of Emotions, Wellness & Human Flourishing
A special issue of the Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences
Submission deadline: November 1, 2018

Organized by the Forum for History of Human Science in honor of historian John C. Burnham (1929-2017), this special issue will bring together historical studies that analyze how the social and behavioral sciences have attended to the meanings and conditions of living well and human flourishing. We are interested in accounts that consider what these sciences, as well as popular works that draw on them, have said about living well, in its spiritual, psychological, cultural, social, economic, and/or political dimensions.

We welcome article-length submissions that explore the development, implementation, and critique of social and behavioral science research and theoretical frameworks in this area. In addition, we are interested in studies that consider the uptake of such work in the broader society, at the level of ideas, social practices, popular culture, and/or public policy. We welcome manuscripts that engage with the topics, geographical areas, and theoretical approaches that Burnham used himself. But we are equally interested in manuscripts that advance other lines of analysis.

Possible topics of historical investigation include:

– self-help and other advice literature
– humanistic psychology, positive psychology, and happiness studies
– work on mindfulness and resilience
– studies of the emotions
– research from behavioral economics
– social justice movements’ use of the behavioral sciences to challenge the conditions and inequalities impeding human flourishing at the levels of the individual, group, and/or society
– social and behavioral scientific studies of “bad habits” and strategies for overcoming them
– critiques of scholarly work and popular accounts of living well, happiness, and/or positive thinking
– the biopolitics of living well
-the relationship between popular and expert views of how to live well and flourish
– the sponsorship of studies on well-being and the use of such work by communities, groups, private organizations, philanthropy, business, and government.

Send manuscript submissions of approximately 10,000, including notes and references, by November 1, 2018 to guest editors Mark Solovey (mark.solovey@utoronto.ca) and Debbie Weinstein (debbie_weinstein@brown.edu). The guest editors also welcome preliminary inquiries about the appropriateness of particular subject matters and lines of analysis. All submissions should follow the format outlined in the journal’s Author Guidelines. Submissions selected by the guest editors will be peer-reviewed per the standard procedures of the journal.

CFP: Second SFHSH Meeting – History of Human and Social Sciences

Call for papers

Second SFHSH Meeting – History of human and social sciences

Paris, 26-28 September 2018

The French Society for the History of Human Sciences (SFHSH) launches the second SFHSH Meeting.

Founded in 1986, the SFHSH has organized several research meetings in history and epistemology of human and social sciences and has published many collective books on the subject (for example, Claude Blanckaert, Laurent Loty, Marc Renneville, Nathalie Richard, Loïc Blondiaux (dir.), L’Histoire des sciences de l’homme. Trajectoiresenjeux et questions vives, Paris, L’Harmattan, 1999; Jacqueline Carroy Nathalie Richard François Vatin (dir.), L’Homme des sciences de l’homme. Une histoire transdisciplinaire, Nanterre, Presses universitaires de Paris Ouest, 2013).

In 2015, the Society decided to organize general meetings, opened to all researchers in the field, on a regular basis. The first edition took place in November 2015, in Paris, and gathered approximately 50 participants.

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Numerous research, often isolated, focus on the history of human and social sciences. In France, a learned society (Société Française pour l’Histoire des Sciences de l’Homme, SFHSH) and a journal (Revue d’histoire des sciences humaines) have been created in order to structure this research field. Their common objective was to give a real intellectual significance to the field and to open new directions in research, often at the crossroads between several disciplines within contemporary social sciences.

The second SFHSH meeting aims at enhancing the visibility of research in the field and at fostering discussions and new collaborations between young and more senior researchers, who often work in different institutions, within different academic domains. During the discussions, new objects and new issues are likely to emerge, and former ones will undoubtedly be questioned through new approaches.

The proposals for symposiums and papers may deal with the following issues (non-limitative list):

– Enquiry and field-work.

– Uses and applications. “Science for action”.

– Actors.

– Boundary issues: art, literature, natural science, etc.

– Practice, methods, material culture.

– Historicity, sources, historiography.

– Institutions.

– Circulation, reception, appropriation.

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Symposium proposals (3 to 5 participants) must include a general presentation (approximately one page, with a short bibliography and a few lines presenting the organizer) and an abstract for each paper (approximately one page, with a short bibliography and a few lines presenting the author).

Proposals for independent papers should consist in an abstract of approximately one page, with a short bibliography and a few lines presenting the author.

The proposals, in French or in English, can be sent to Jacqueline Carroy and to Nathalie Richard before Tuesday 20, March 2018

jacqueline.carroy@wanadoo.fr

Nathalie.Richard@univ-lemans.fr

The Scientific Committee of the conference is the Executive Board of SFHSH. Proposals will be reviewed in April 2018 and results will be communicated early May 2018.

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SFHSH Membership:

– 30 €   (regular member)

– 15 €   (student, unemployed)

– 45 €  (institution)

See details on its website : https://sfhsh.hypotheses.org/la-sfhsh

Call for Papers: ESHHS Conference in Groningen July 17-20, 2018

The European Society for the History of the Human Sciences (ESHHS) has issued its call for papers for its 2018 meeting in Groningen, July 17-20th.

The conference is hosted by the department of Theory and History of Psychology, Faculty of Behavioural and Social Sciences, University of Groningen, the Netherlands and organized in collaboration with Open University of the Netherlands. Oral presentations, posters, sessions or workshops may deal with any aspect of the history of the human, behavioural and social sciences or with related historiographic and methodological issues (including those related to digital history). This year we particularly invite submissions that deal with external factors – political, ethical, economical or otherwise – that lead to marginalization of theoretical and historical research in the human, behavioural and social sciences. Full submission details can be found here.

Full submission details can be found here.

CfP: 50th Anniversary Meeting of Cheiron, June 21-24, 2018, Akron, OH

Call for Papers: 50th Annual Meeting of Cheiron: The International Society for the History of Behavioral and Social Sciences
Conference Date: June 21-24, 2018
Conference Location: University of Akron, Akron, Ohio
Submission Due Date: January 15, 2018, 5pm CST
Websitehttps://www.uakron.edu/cheiron/

Papers, posters, symposia/panels, or workshops are invited for the 50th annual meeting of Cheiron: The International Society for the History of Behavioral and Social Sciences. The conference will be held at the University of Akron, in Akron, Ohio, with Cathy Faye as local host. The University of Akron is the home of the Cummings Center for the History of Psychology, home to the National Museum of Psychology and the Archives of the History of American Psychology.

The Akron-Canton Airport is about a 20-minute drive from campus.  Cleveland Hopkins International Airport is a 45-minute drive from campus. Dormitory accommodations will be available at a very affordable price, along with local hotel options. Further travel details will provided in the coming months.

Submissions may deal with any aspect of the history of the human, behavioral, and social sciences or related historiographical and methodological issues. For this year’s 50th meeting, we particularly encourage submissions that address changes in historiography in the behavioral and social sciences over the past half century. All submissions should conform to the guidelines listed below.

All submissions must be received by 5pm CST, January 15, 2018. Please email your proposals to the 2018 Program Chair, Robert Kugelmann, at kugelman@udallas.edu.

Guidelines 

All papers, posters, and proposed symposia/panels should focus on new and original work, i.e. the main part of the work should not have been published or presented previously at other conferences.

To facilitate the peer review and planning process, please provide a separate page that includes: a) title; b) author’s name and affiliation; c) author’s mail and email address and phone number; d) audio/visual needs. In all types of proposals below, names of authors/presenters should not be indicated anywhere but on the separate cover page for the submission.

Papers: Submit a 700-800 word abstract plus references that contains the major sources that inform your work. Presentations at the meeting will be 20-25 minutes in length.

Posters: Submit a 300-400 word abstract plus references that contains the major sources that inform your work.

Symposia/Panels: Organizer should submit a 250-300 word abstract describing the symposium as a whole and a list of the names and affiliations of the participants. Each participant should submit a 300-600 word abstract plus references that contains the major sources that inform your work.

Workshops: Organizer should submit a 250-300 word abstract describing the workshop and, if applicable, a list of the names and affiliations of those participating.

Special Events for Cheiron’s 50th

To celebrate Cheiron’s 50th meeting, some special events are planned.  Kathy Milar is in charge of the Anniversary Planning Committee. Special events are in the planning stages and anyone with ideas should contact Kathy at kathym@earlham.edu for further information.

Travel Stipends & Young Scholar Award

Travel Stipends: Cheiron will make funds available to help defray travel expenses for students, as well as other scholars facing financial hardship, who present at the conference. We encourage everyone to apply for support from their home institutions. The Travel Stipend is limited to $100 to $300 per accepted submission; stipends for co-authored presentations must be divided among the presenters. If you wish to be considered for the Travel Stipend, please apply by sending the Program Chair a separate email message, explaining your status, at the same time that you submit your proposal.

Young Scholar Award: Since 2008, Cheiron has awarded a prize for the best paper or symposium presentation by a young scholar. To be eligible for consideration, the young scholar must be the sole or first author on the paper and must be responsible for the bulk of the work of the paper. The young scholar must be a student currently or must have completed doctoral work not more than 5 years prior to the meeting.

About three weeks after the meeting, applicants for this award will submit a copy of the presented paper (rather than the abstract); it may include further, minor changes. Submissions go to the Cheiron Executive Officer, who sets the exact deadline, and the entries will be judged by members of the Program Committee and the Review Committee. The winner will receive a certificate from Cheiron and will be asked to submit the paper to the Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences within a reasonable period of time. The Award winner may ask Cheiron for assistance in preparing the paper for submission to JHBS. If the paper is accepted by JHBS for publication, the winner will receive a $500 honorarium from the publisher, Wiley-Blackwell, in recognition of the Cheiron Young Scholar Award. Please note that the award committee may choose not to grant an award in any given year and that the honorarium depends on publication in JHBS, in addition to winning the Award.

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CONTACT INFORMATION:

Concerning meeting program, or the Travel Stipend, contact the 2018 Program Chair:
Robert Kugelmann, Psychology Department, University of Dallas
kugelman@udallas.edu
Telephone: 972-721-5268 (office)
For questions about local arrangements, contact Cathy Faye at cfaye@uakron.edu
For questions about the Young Scholar Award or general organizational issues, contact David K. Robinson, Cheiron Executive Officer: drobinso@truman.edu
Anyone wanting to contribute ideas for the 50th anniversary, contact Kathy Milar: kathym@earlham.edu

CfP: Fifth Annual Conference on the History of Recent Social Science, Zurich June 8-9, 2018

The Society for the History of Recent Social Science has issued a call for papers for its 2018 meeting, to be held in Zurich June 8th and 9th. Full details below.

Call for Papers
Fifth Annual Conference on the History of Recent Social Science
University of Zurich, Switzerland

June 8-9, 2018

This two-day conference of the Society for the History of Recent Social Science (HISRESS) will bring together researchers working on the history of post-World War II social science. It will provide a forum for the latest research on the cross-disciplinary history of the post-war social sciences, including but not limited to anthropology, economics, psychology, political science, and sociology as well as related fields like area studies, communication studies, history, international relations, law and linguistics. We are especially eager to receive submissions that treat themes, topics, and events that span the history of individual disciplines.

The conference aims to build upon the recent emergence of work and conversation on cross-disciplinary themes in the postwar history of the social sciences. While large parts of history of social science scholarship still focus on the 19th and early 20th centuries and are attuned to the histories of individual disciplines, there is also a larger interest now in the developments spanning the social sciences in the early, late, and post-Cold War periods. Though each of the major social science fields has a community of disciplinary historians, research explicitly concerned with cross-disciplinary topics remains comparatively rare. The purpose of the conference is to further encourage fruitful cross-disciplinary conversations of recent years.

Submissions are welcome in areas such as:

  • The uptake of social science concepts and figures in wider intellectual and popular discourses
  • Comparative institutional histories of departments and programs
  • Border disputes and boundary work between disciplines as well as academic cultures
  • Themes and concepts developed in the history and sociology of natural and physical science, reconceptualized for the social science context
  • Professional and applied training programs and schools, and the quasi-disciplinary fields (like business administration) that typically housed them
  • The role of social science in post-colonial state-building governance
  • Social science adaptations to the changing media landscape
  • The role and prominence of disciplinary memory in a comparative context

The two-day conference will be organized as a series of one-hour, single-paper sessions attended by all participants. Ample time will be set aside for intellectual exchange between presenters and attendees, as all participants are expected to read pre-circulated papers in advance.

Proposals should contain no more than 1000 words, indicating the originality of the paper. The deadline for receipt of abstracts is February 4, 2018. Final notification will be given in early March 2018 after proposals have been reviewed. Completed papers will be expected by May 13, 2018.

The organizing committee consists of Jamie Cohen-Cole (George Washington University), Philippe Fontaine (École normale supérieure de Cachan), Catherine Herfeld (University of Zurich), and Jeff Pooley (Muhlenberg College).

All proposals and requests for information should be sent to: hisress2018@gmail.com.

International Conference: Mind Reading as Cultural Practice

AHP readers may be interested in a call for paper for a conference on “Mind Reading as Cultural Practice” to be held at the Institute for Cultural Theory and History, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, 22-23 March 2018. Full details below.

Mind Reading as Cultural Practice
International Conference to be held at the Institute for Cultural Theory and History, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, 22-23 March 2018

Convenors: Laurens Schlicht and Christian Fassung (Humboldt University Berlin, Germany), Simone Natale (Loughborough University, UK)

Throughout the nineteenth and twentieth century, a wide range of technologies and techniques have been developed to generate knowledge about what people feel, think, wish, or plan. To give just a few examples, employ physiological evidence to establish if a subject is telling the truth or if s/he is lying; subfields of psychology such as characterology are designed to identify and recognize certain types; and recently computing technologies employ algorithm and facial recognition software to make inferences about feelings and mental states.

Yet, relatively few attempts have been made to address such diverse practices in conjunction and connection with each other. This conference aims to fill this gap. Employing the concept of mind reading in a broad sense as designating any technique that helps to create knowledge about people’s feelings and states of mind, it aims to stimulate a critical debate about mind reading techniques as forms of knowledge and in regard to their political, social, and cultural dimension.

The conference’s objective is to promote a cross-disciplinary debate, taking into account also areas of knowledge that are often excluded from academic discourse, such as the occult practices of parapsychology or the practices of local police officers and marketing operatives. In this regard, speakers are encouraged to engage with a set of questions connected to the historical, epistemic and cultural dimensions of mind reading. Potential topics include but are not limited to:

– The design, production and use of technologies of mind reading. How were these technologies developed, and how did they inform the development of mind reading practices? Which functions did they have in terms of knowledge production and dissemination, and to what extent were they related to the development of discourses about technology, objectivity, subjectivity, and science?

– A perspective from historical epistemology: how are the objects of research on mind reading produced and shaped? What kinds of epistemic techniques are employed to generate knowledge about people’s state of mind, feelings, or about the veracity of their statements?

– The construction of subjectivity based on mind reading techniques: in certain specific contexts, modes of subjectivity such as the “psychopath” or the “neurasthenic” provided an important conceptual framework both for science, the legal system, and for people’s self-conception. How did the practices under consideration help to create, consolidate, or change modes of subjectivity?

– The cultural and political dimensions of mind reading: how did such technologies and practices contribute to re-shape political regimes? Which political and cultural roles did mind reading techniques play? How far and to what extent did mind reading have a transformative impact in the political arena and on broad economic and social phenomena?

Confirmed speakers include Christian Bachhiesl, Melissa Littlefield, Roger Luckhurst, Annette Mülberger, and Michael Pettit.

We welcome proposals for papers from all disciplines connected to the subject areas mentioned above. Those who wish to submit a paper should send an abstract of no more than 300 words and a short CV or bio to the following address: laurens.schlicht@hu-berlin.de

Deadline: October 1st, 2017