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CfP: 50th Anniversary Meeting of Cheiron, June 21-24, 2018, Akron, OH

Call for Papers: 50th Annual Meeting of Cheiron: The International Society for the History of Behavioral and Social Sciences
Conference Date: June 21-24, 2018
Conference Location: University of Akron, Akron, Ohio
Submission Due Date: January 15, 2018, 5pm CST
Websitehttps://www.uakron.edu/cheiron/

Papers, posters, symposia/panels, or workshops are invited for the 50th annual meeting of Cheiron: The International Society for the History of Behavioral and Social Sciences. The conference will be held at the University of Akron, in Akron, Ohio, with Cathy Faye as local host. The University of Akron is the home of the Cummings Center for the History of Psychology, home to the National Museum of Psychology and the Archives of the History of American Psychology.

The Akron-Canton Airport is about a 20-minute drive from campus.  Cleveland Hopkins International Airport is a 45-minute drive from campus. Dormitory accommodations will be available at a very affordable price, along with local hotel options. Further travel details will provided in the coming months.

Submissions may deal with any aspect of the history of the human, behavioral, and social sciences or related historiographical and methodological issues. For this year’s 50th meeting, we particularly encourage submissions that address changes in historiography in the behavioral and social sciences over the past half century. All submissions should conform to the guidelines listed below.

All submissions must be received by 5pm CST, January 15, 2018. Please email your proposals to the 2018 Program Chair, Robert Kugelmann, at kugelman@udallas.edu.

Guidelines 

All papers, posters, and proposed symposia/panels should focus on new and original work, i.e. the main part of the work should not have been published or presented previously at other conferences.

To facilitate the peer review and planning process, please provide a separate page that includes: a) title; b) author’s name and affiliation; c) author’s mail and email address and phone number; d) audio/visual needs. In all types of proposals below, names of authors/presenters should not be indicated anywhere but on the separate cover page for the submission.

Papers: Submit a 700-800 word abstract plus references that contains the major sources that inform your work. Presentations at the meeting will be 20-25 minutes in length.

Posters: Submit a 300-400 word abstract plus references that contains the major sources that inform your work.

Symposia/Panels: Organizer should submit a 250-300 word abstract describing the symposium as a whole and a list of the names and affiliations of the participants. Each participant should submit a 300-600 word abstract plus references that contains the major sources that inform your work.

Workshops: Organizer should submit a 250-300 word abstract describing the workshop and, if applicable, a list of the names and affiliations of those participating.

Special Events for Cheiron’s 50th

To celebrate Cheiron’s 50th meeting, some special events are planned.  Kathy Milar is in charge of the Anniversary Planning Committee. Special events are in the planning stages and anyone with ideas should contact Kathy at kathym@earlham.edu for further information.

Travel Stipends & Young Scholar Award

Travel Stipends: Cheiron will make funds available to help defray travel expenses for students, as well as other scholars facing financial hardship, who present at the conference. We encourage everyone to apply for support from their home institutions. The Travel Stipend is limited to $100 to $300 per accepted submission; stipends for co-authored presentations must be divided among the presenters. If you wish to be considered for the Travel Stipend, please apply by sending the Program Chair a separate email message, explaining your status, at the same time that you submit your proposal.

Young Scholar Award: Since 2008, Cheiron has awarded a prize for the best paper or symposium presentation by a young scholar. To be eligible for consideration, the young scholar must be the sole or first author on the paper and must be responsible for the bulk of the work of the paper. The young scholar must be a student currently or must have completed doctoral work not more than 5 years prior to the meeting.

About three weeks after the meeting, applicants for this award will submit a copy of the presented paper (rather than the abstract); it may include further, minor changes. Submissions go to the Cheiron Executive Officer, who sets the exact deadline, and the entries will be judged by members of the Program Committee and the Review Committee. The winner will receive a certificate from Cheiron and will be asked to submit the paper to the Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences within a reasonable period of time. The Award winner may ask Cheiron for assistance in preparing the paper for submission to JHBS. If the paper is accepted by JHBS for publication, the winner will receive a $500 honorarium from the publisher, Wiley-Blackwell, in recognition of the Cheiron Young Scholar Award. Please note that the award committee may choose not to grant an award in any given year and that the honorarium depends on publication in JHBS, in addition to winning the Award.

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CONTACT INFORMATION:

Concerning meeting program, or the Travel Stipend, contact the 2018 Program Chair:
Robert Kugelmann, Psychology Department, University of Dallas
kugelman@udallas.edu
Telephone: 972-721-5268 (office)
For questions about local arrangements, contact Cathy Faye at cfaye@uakron.edu
For questions about the Young Scholar Award or general organizational issues, contact David K. Robinson, Cheiron Executive Officer: drobinso@truman.edu
Anyone wanting to contribute ideas for the 50th anniversary, contact Kathy Milar: kathym@earlham.edu

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“The Long and Winding Road: 125 years of the American Psychological Association”

Having just wrapped up the convention celebrating the 125th anniversary of the American Psychological Association, this is a good time to reflect back on the the association’s history. John Greenwood does just that in a new piece in Behavioral Scientist:

It began humbly enough. In 1892, Granville Stanley Hall, professor of psychology and president of Clark University, invited 26 American psychologists to join him in forming a psychological association. A dozen invitees attended the first organizational meeting, in Hall’s office, on July 8, 1892. There, they founded the American Psychological Association. The participants learned that many psychologists who could not attend the meeting, such as John Dewey and Lightner Witmer, had agreed to join, and they selected two psychologists who had not been originally invited, Hugo Münsterberg of Harvard and Edward Titchener of Cornell. They elected Hall as the first president and scheduled their first meeting, at the University of Pennsylvania, for December of that year.

….

From its inception, membership in the APA was inclusive, at least with respect to religion and gender. The charter members included Edward Pace, a Catholic, and Joseph Jastrow, a Jew, who devised conventions for reporting that evolved into APA style. Two women, Mary Calkins and Christine Ladd-Franklin, were elected members in 1893.

But membership did not guarantee equal standing. Calkins studied at Harvard under James and Münsterberg, who judged her dissertation on learned paired associates to be the best produced in the Department of Philosophy. Yet Harvard declined to award her a degree because Harvard did not then grant degrees to women. Calkins went on to found her own laboratory and psychology program at Wellesley College. She became the first woman elected to the American Psychological Association (1905) and to the American Philosophical Association (1918). (In 1902 Harvard grudgingly offered her a degree from Radcliffe College, which she declined as “second-best.”)

Read the full piece here.

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Reimaging Human Relations in Our Time: 4-Day Festival Celebrating 70 Years of the Tavistock Institute

The Tavistock Institute is hosting a 4 day festival, Reimagining Human Relations in Our Time, October 17th-20th to mark its 70th anniversary. For those interested in the history of the Tavistock Institute events on Thursday October 19th are on the theme of “In the Shadow and Light of the Archive.” As the Festival’s site notes “This theme takes a historical lens to reflect on the meaning of the Tavistock Institute’s work including the ways in which our archive contributes to organisational development practice; moving from the seminal work as shadows towards standing on the shoulders of giants.” More generally,

Reimagining Human Relations in Our Time is a festival celebrating 70 years of the Tavistock Institute. At the heart of the festival is the Institute’s archive which over the last two years has been intricately and delicately catalogued at Wellcome Library. These two things coinciding, our anniversary and the launch of the archive, are a great cause for celebration in particular the insights of our forebears as they tackled past societal challenges and their application to our work today. For instance how can we respond to an environment at tipping point, ageing and social care, displaced people and populations, crises in faith, identity and leadership, our wellbeing at work?

The festival website is the starting place for you to begin your research and participation with access to a rich programme which offers opportunities to take part, reflect, dream, debate, consider, and perform. With its online booking system and easy to view programme you will be able to curate your own festival experience.

Find out more about this anniversary festival, including full programming details, here.

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