More HOP Graphic Novels: It’s Harry Harlow’s Turn

AHP has previously posted on the relationship between graphic novels and the history of psychology – in terms of psychology’s interactions with the reading of comics, the lie detector-Wonder Woman link, and the ways its history has periodically found its way into the stories themselves (see Freud’s appearance as a superhero and the Kitty Genovese connection … Continue reading More HOP Graphic Novels: It’s Harry Harlow’s Turn

Forthcoming in History of Psychiatry: Harlow, Bowlby, and Bettelheim; Freud on Alice of Battenberg; and More

A number of articles now forthcoming in History of Psychiatry may be of interest to AHP readers. Details about the pieces, all online now, follow below. “The nature of love: Harlow, Bowlby and Bettelheim on affectionless mothers,” Lenny van Rosmalen, René van der Veer, Frank C. P. van der Horst. Abstract: Harry Harlow, famous for … Continue reading Forthcoming in History of Psychiatry: Harlow, Bowlby, and Bettelheim; Freud on Alice of Battenberg; and More

New History of Psychiatry: Melancholy, Madness, Chinese Psychiatry, Psychedelic Therapy, and More

The June 2020 issue of History of Psychiatry is now online. Full details follow below: “Wild melancholy. On the historical plausibility of a black bile theory of blood madness, or hæmatomania,” Jan Verplaetse. Abstract: Nineteenth-century art historian John Addington Symonds coined the term hæmatomania (blood madness) for the extremely bloodthirsty behaviour of a number of … Continue reading New History of Psychiatry: Melancholy, Madness, Chinese Psychiatry, Psychedelic Therapy, and More

Interview with Marga Vicedo on The Nature and Nurture of Love

AHP is pleased to present an interview with historian of science Marga Vicedo on her recent book The Nature and Nurture of Love: From Imprinting to Attachment in Cold War America. The full interview follows below. Many thanks to Marga for agreeing to be interviewed! AHP: As a historian and philosopher of biology how did you first become … Continue reading Interview with Marga Vicedo on The Nature and Nurture of Love

The History of Psychology as Multispecies Network, Part 1

This is the first of a special series of posts on the digital history of psychology from members of the PsyBorgs Lab at York University, in Toronto, Canada. The full series of posts can be found here. In our current moment, the network has become one of the most prominent metaphors for the social. Social Network Analysis … Continue reading The History of Psychology as Multispecies Network, Part 1

New Book: The Nature and Nurture of Love

A new volume exploring the history of human instincts has just been published by the University of Chicago Press. In The Nature and Nurture of Love: From Imprinting to Attachment in Cold War America historian of biology Marga Vicedo explores how the idea of instinctual mother love took hold. As described on the publisher’s website, The … Continue reading New Book: The Nature and Nurture of Love

APA Monitor: McConnell’s Worm Runner’s Digest

The first 2013 issue of the American Psychological Association’s Monitor on Psychology is now online. This month’s Time Capsule section features a piece by Larry Stern on psychologist James McConnell’s efforts to poke fun at the discipline. In 1959, McConnell began the Worm Runner’s Digest after the appearance of his memory transfer research in the … Continue reading APA Monitor: McConnell’s Worm Runner’s Digest

New in Isis: History of Textbooks, Funding

The March 2012 issue of Isis, the official journal of the History of Science Society, is now online. Included in this issue are a couple of articles of interest to historians of psychology. In “Senator Fred Harris’s National Social Science Foundation Proposal” Mark Solovey explores efforts to reform American social science funding during the 1960s. … Continue reading New in Isis: History of Textbooks, Funding

Revisiting Yesterday’s Psychology Today

The Association for Psychological Science‘s (APS) popular periodical, the Observer is publishing an ongoing series of reflections upon interviews with prominent psychologists originally published in Psychology Today decades ago. As described on the Observer‘s website, Digging into the history of psychological science, the Observer has retrieved classic interviews with prominent psychological scientists for an ongoing … Continue reading Revisiting Yesterday’s Psychology Today