Tag Archives: Horst Gundlach

CfP: European Yearbook of the History of Psychology

Screen Shot 2014-06-10 at 2.58.40 PMA new peer-reviewed journal dedicated to the history of psychology has just issued a call for papers. As announced on the blog earlier this year, the European Yearbook of the History of Psychology (EYHP) is edited by Mauro Antonelli, University of Milano. Horst Gundlach, of the University of Würzburg, is Co-Editor. The full call for papers follows below.

European Yearbook of the History of Psychology (EYHP). Sources, Theories, and Models

Call for Papers

The European Yearbook of the History of Psychology. Sources, Theories, and Models (EYHP) is a new peer-reviewed international Journal devoted to the history of psychology, published by Brepols Publishers. This new journal is now indexed on the web site of Brepols Publishers: http://brepols.metapress.com/content/122892/?v=editorial

The editorial board is excited to announce its first call for papers of EYHP’s for the first number to be published in winter 2014

Besides Original essays on interdisciplinary topics pertaining to psychological research and interconnections between historiographic survey and epistemology, the Yearbook encompasses the following sections: Unpublished and archival material; Discussions (a space where authors can confront one another and discuss specific topics); Interviews; Book reviews and reading recommendations.

Contributions should be written preferably in English,however contributions in French, Italian, and German are also welcome (but must be accompanied by an English abstract). Articles should be between 5,000 and 8,000 words in length, including footnotes (however exceptions can be taken into consideration by the editors). Contributions should be submitted by September 15 to:

Prof. Mauro Antonelli
Department of Psychology
University of Milano – Bicocca
Piazza dell’Ateneo Nuovo 1
20126 Milano
Italy

Email: mauro.antonelli@unimib.it

For informal details contact the editor, Mauro Antonelli (mauro.antonelli@unimib.it)

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Interview: Special Issue on “Crisis” in Psychology

AHP is please to present an interview with Annette Mülberger (left) and Thomas Sturm (right), editors of a fantastic forthcoming special issue of Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences on the long history of crisis declarations in psychology. The issue is the culmination of a larger research project on crisis debates in psychology. Although the issue itself has not yet been released, the articles comprising it can now be accessed online in their entirety. Read on to discover how the issue came to be, which crisis declarations are addressed in the issue, why such declarations matter, and much more!

Titles, authors, and abstracts to the issue’s articles follow below the interview.

AHP: Can you tell Advances in the History of Psychology’s readers, briefly, about the topic of this special issue of Studies in the History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences?

Annette: The topic is the manifold crisis declarations and discussions psychology has seen – and partly suffered – since the late nineteenth century. It’s a topic that has not been studied very systematically by either philosophers or historians of the field. Instead, some psychologists have dealt with it, pursuing reflections on the methodological or theoretical or practical problems of psychology.

AHP: How did the issue come to be?

Thomas: The topic was originally Annette’s idea. I needed about three seconds to accept the project because of its potential for integrating historical and philosophical investigations, something I think is necessary. Not always, but often. The topic also presented an occasion for me to work on the Viennese psychologist and philosopher Karl Bühler and his student Karl Popper, a relation I had found interesting. Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences is a great journal for such a topic. The editors accepted our proposal quickly.

AHP: Who are the contributors to the issue?

Thomas: An international group of historians and philosophers of psychology, of course. Next to ourselves, these are Christian Allesch, John Carson, Cathy Faye, Uljana Feest, Horst Gundlach, Gary Hatfield, and Ludmila Hyman. We looked deliberately for people who had, in their previous work, shown sensitivity to both disciplines. Needless to say, some contributions put a little more weight on the historical than the philosophical dimensions, or the other way around. We had to push each other to give sufficient weight to both aspects, and that was instructive for all of us – and even fun.

AHP: What instances of crisis declarations in psychology do the articles in the special issue address?

Annette: The contributions begin with the first explicitly so-called declaration of a crisis in psychology by the nowadays mostly unknown Swiss philosopher-psychologist named Rudolf Willy, stemming from 1897 and followed by a whole book in 1899. Continue reading Interview: Special Issue on “Crisis” in Psychology

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