Emily Martin’s “Ethnography, History and Philosophy of Experimental Psychology”

A new chapter on “Ethnography, History and Philosophy of Experimental Psychology” may be of interest to AHP readers. Written by anthropologist Emily Martin, the chapter is included in the newly released volume Finite but Unbounded: New Approaches in Philosophical Anthropology (edited by Kevin M. Cahill, Martin Gustafsson, and Thomas Schwarz Wentzer). The abstract for the chapter reads:

Historians of psychology have described how the ‘introspection’ of early Wundtian psychology largely came to be ruled out of experimental psychology settings by the mid 20th century. In this paper I take a fresh look at the years before this process was complete – from the vantage point of early ethnographic and psychological field expeditions. Beginning with the psychological research conducted during and after the Cambridge Anthropological Expedition to the Torres Straits Islands (CAETS) in 1898, I will discuss the importance of the CAETS in the history of anthropology and psychology and explore some possible ways of approaching experimental cognitive psychology ethnographically. I describe the experience of Ludwig Wittgenstein in the Cambridge experimental psychology lab founded after the CAETS by C.S. Myers, focusing on its implications for Wittgenstein’s later thought and for contemporary ‘affect theory’.

Share on Facebook

About Jacy Young

Jacy Young recently completed a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) of Canada Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Surrey in the UK. She earned her doctorate in the History and Theory of Psychology at York University in 2014.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *