Category Archives: Conferences

Call for Papers: Techniques of the Corporation, Toronto May 4-6, 2017

Call for Papers: Techniques of the Corporation
4-6 May 2017, University of Toronto

How do corporations know themselves and their world? Over the last 150 years, corporations, like universities and laboratories, have generated an abundance of knowledge-making techniques in the form of psychological test, efficiency technologies, scenario planning, and logistical systems. As dominant forms of the last century, corporations are assembled with instruments, infrastructures, and interventions that arrange and rearrange the dynamics of capitalism. These techniques of the corporation have filtered into our daily lives, influencing everyday understandings of self, inequality, environment, and society.

Techniques of the Corporation will assemble an interdisciplinary network of established and emerging scholars whose work contributes to the critical study of the techniques, epistemologies, and imaginaries of the 20th century corporation. This conference aims to foster a timely conversation between Science and Technology Studies (STS) approaches and the recent histories of capitalism. We treat the corporation in the same way that historians of science and STS scholars have approached science, colonialism, and militarism as generative sites for knowledge production, value-making, and technopolitics. The conference takes as its starting place North American corporations with the understanding that corporations are multinational forms with complex transnational histories. Building from the recent history of capitalism, we attend to the entangled genealogies of corporations with slavery, exploitation, environmental destruction, colonialism, and inequality.

Hosted by the Technoscience Research Unit at the University of Toronto, this event will be an intimate multi-day conversation between established and emerging scholars in the fields of STS, history of science, and the history of capitalism. Techniques of the Corporation will be headlined by keynote speaker Joseph Dumit, and features invited talks by Dan Bouk, Elspeth Brown, Deborah Cowen, Orit Halpern, Louis Hyman, Michelle Murphy, Martha Poon, and Elise Thorburn. The conference will be an immersive experience in the Greater Toronto Area with meals and cocktails provided.

We invite emerging and established scholars in diverse fields (including business history; labour history; anthropology; geography; economic sociology; media studies; critical race studies; architecture studies; feminist and sexuality studies; environmental studies; and cultural studies) to explore the techniques, epistemologies, and imaginaries of corporations. Our overall goal is to crystallize a new field, culminating in a field-defining publication. We welcome work on corporate practices that exceed calculative logics, such as work on  social relations, affective and psychological states, and speculative futurities.  In addition to traditional papers, the conference encourages creative methods to query corporate forms, including art installations, videos, interactive multimedia projects, and role-playing games. Applications for travel assistance will be arranged after acceptance.

Corporate practices, include, but are not limited to:

  • management
  • marketing
  • planning
  • infrastructure  logistics
  • gaming
  • racial surveillance
  • sharing economy
  • risk management
  • corporate responsibility
  • sustainability
  • corporate design
  • precarity
  • architecture
  • data management
  • corporate culture
  • consulting
  • research and development
  • intellectual property
  • affective labor
  • transnational capital

Please submit abstracts of no more than 300 words and a CV to the conference organizers (Justin Douglas, Bretton Fosbrook, Kira Lussier, and Michelle Murphy) at corporatetechniques@gmail.com by 13 January 2017.

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CFP: 4th Annual Conference on the History of Recent Social Science, June 9-10, 2017

FOURTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON THE HISTORY OF RECENT SOCIAL SCIENCE (HISRESS)

Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands

June 9-10, 2017

This two-day conference of the Society for the History of Recent Social Science (HISRESS) will bring together researchers working on the history of post-World War II social science. It will provide a forum for the latest research on the cross-disciplinary history of the post-war social sciences, including but not limited to anthropology, economics, psychology, political science, and sociology as well as related fields like area studies, communication studies, history, international relations, law and linguistics. We are especially eager to receive submissions that treat themes, topics, and events that span the history of individual disciplines.

The conference aims to build upon the recent emergence of work and conversation on cross-disciplinary themes in the postwar history of the social sciences. A number of monographs, edited collections, special journal issues, and gatherings at the École normale supérieure de Cachan, Duke University, Harvard University, the London School of Economics, New York University, the University of Toronto and elsewhere testify to a growing interest in the developments spanning the social sciences in the early, late, and post-Cold War periods. Most history of social science scholarship, however, remains focused on the 19th and early 20th centuries, and attuned to the histories of individual disciplines. Though each of the major social science fields now has a community of disciplinary historians, research explicitly concerned with cross-disciplinary topics remains comparatively rare. The purpose of the conference is to further encourage the limited but fruitful cross-disciplinary conversations of recent years.

Submissions are welcome in areas such as:

  • The uptake of social science concepts and figures in wider intellectual and popular discourses
  • Comparative institutional histories of departments and programs
  • Border disputes and boundary work between disciplines as well as academic cultures
  • Themes and concepts developed in the history and sociology of natural and physical science, reconceptualized for the social science context
  • Professional and applied training programs and schools, and the quasi-disciplinary fields (like business administration) that typically housed them
  • The role of social science in post-colonial state-building governance
  • Social science adaptations to the changing media landscape
  • The role and prominence of disciplinary memory in a comparative context

The two-day conference of the Society for the History of Recent Social Science, hosted by the Erasmus Institute for Public Knowledge in collaboration with theErasmus School of History, Culture and Communication and the Faculty of Social Sciences at Erasmus University Rotterdam, will be organized as a series of one-hour, single-paper sessions attended by all participants. Ample time will be set aside for intellectual exchange between presenters and attendees, as all participants are expected to read pre-circulated papers in advance.

Proposals should contain no more than 1000 words, indicating the originality of the paper. The deadline for receipt of abstracts is February 3, 2017. Final notification will be given in early March 2017 after proposals have been reviewed. Completed papers will be expected by May 15, 2017.

The organizing committee consists of

Jamie Cohen-Cole (George Washington University), Bregje van Eekelen (executive organizer, Erasmus University Rotterdam), Philippe Fontaine (École normale supérieure de Cachan), and Jeff Pooley (Muhlenberg College).

All proposals and requests for information should be sent to: hisress2017@gmail.com. For more information on the Society for the History of Recent Social Science (HISRESS), see www.hisress.org.

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Call for Submissions Cheiron 2017, Deadline January 15, 2017

Cheiron, the International Society for the History of Behavioral and Social Sciences, has issued a call for submissions for their 49th Annual Meeting to be held June 22, 25. Full details follow below.

 

Call for Papers: 49th Annual Meeting of Cheiron: The International Society for the History of Behavioral and Social Sciences

Conference Date: June 22-25, 2017
Conference Location: Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS
Submission Due Date: January 15, 2017, 5pm EST
Websitehttps://www.uakron.edu/cheiron/

Papers, posters, symposia/panels, or workshops are invited for the 49th annual meeting of Cheiron: The International Society for the History of Behavioral and Social Sciences. The conference will be held at Mississippi State University, Starkville (two hours/160 miles from Memphis, TN), with Courtney Thompson as local co-host, assisted by Alexandra Hui and Alan Marcus. Starkville’s local Golden Triangle Regional Airport, with service from Atlanta, provides free shuttle service to Starkville, including the MSU campus. The meeting will take place Thursday, June 22, to Sunday, June 25, 2017.

Submissions may deal with any aspect of the history of the human, behavioral, and social sciences or related historiographical and methodological issues. For this year’s meeting in Mississippi we particularly encourage submissions of all formats (papers, posters, symposia/panels, and workshops) which explore issues related to LGBTQ+, as well as gender, race/ethnicity, and other marginalized communities. All submissions should conform to the guidelines listed below.

All submissions must be received by 5pm EST, January 15, 2017. Please email your proposals to the 2017 Program Chair, Jacy Young at jacyleeyoung@gmail.com

Guidelines

All papers, posters, and proposed symposia/panels should focus on new and original work, i.e. the main part of the work should not have been published or presented previously at other conferences.

To facilitate the peer review and planning process, please provide a separate page that includes: a) title; b) author’s name and affiliation; c) author’s mail and email address and phone number; d) audio/visual needs. In all types of proposals below, names of authors/presenters should not be indicated anywhere but on the separate cover page for the submission.

Papers: Submit a 700-800 word abstract plus references that contains the major sources that inform your work. Presentations should be 20-25 minutes in length.

Posters: Submit a 300-400 word abstract plus references that contains the major sources that inform your work.

Symposia/Panels: Organizer should submit a 250-300 word abstract describing the symposium as a whole and a list of the names and affiliations of the participants. Each participant should submit a 300-600 word abstract plus references that contains the major sources that inform your work.
Workshops: Organizer should submit a 250-300 word abstract describing the workshop and, if applicable, a list of the names and affiliations of those participating.

Travel Stipends & Young Scholar Award

Travel Stipends: Cheiron will make funds available to help defray travel expenses for students, as well as other scholars facing financial hardship, who present at the conference. We encourage everyone to apply for support from their home institutions. The Travel Stipend is limited to $100 to $300 per accepted submission; co-authored presentations must be divided among the presenters. If you wish to be considered for the Stipend, please apply by sending the Program Chair a separate email message, explaining your status, at the same time that you submit your proposal.

Young Scholar Award: Since 2008, Cheiron has awarded a prize for the best paper or symposium presentation by a young scholar. To be eligible for consideration, the young scholar must be the sole or first author on the paper and must be responsible for the bulk of the work of the paper. The young scholar must be a student currently or must have completed doctoral work (or other final degree) not more than 5 years prior to the meeting. Past winners of this award are no longer eligible.

About three weeks after the meeting, applicants for this award will submit a copy of the presented paper (rather than the abstract); it may include further, minor changes and bibliography. Submissions go to the Cheiron Executive Officer, who sets the exact deadline and determines eligibility, and the entries will be judged by select members of the Program Committee and the Review Committee. The winner will be announced by early autumn following the Cheiron meeting, will receive a certificate, and will be asked to submit the paper to the Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences within a reasonable period of time. The Award winner may ask Cheiron for assistance in preparing the paper for submission to JHBS. If the paper is accepted by JHBS for publication, the winner will receive a $500 honorarium from the publisher, Wiley-Blackwell, in recognition of the Cheiron Young Scholar Award. Please note that the award committee may choose not to grant an award in any given year and that the honorarium depends on publication in JHBS, in addition to winning the Award.

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CONTACT INFORMATION:

Concerning meeting program, contact 2017 Program Chair:
Jacy Young
Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Surrey UK
jacyleeyoung@gmail.com

For questions about the Young Scholar Award or general organizational issues, contact
David K. Robinson, Cheiron Executive Officer: drobinso@truman.edu

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History of Human Science Talks at HHS, Atlanta, Nov. 3-6, 2016

As a followup to yesterday’s post on the Forum for History of Human Science (FHHS) sponsored session at the History of Science Society (HSS) meeting, November 3rd through 6th in Atlanta, we’ve rounded up all the history of human science content on the program.

Still to be announced are the FHHS business meeting and invited speaker.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2016
1:30 PM – 3:30 PM
Session 1. Between the Natural and Human Sciences: Historical Lessons from the Study of [Our] Brains and Behaviors
Chair(s): Tara Abraham, University of Guelph
Organizer(s): Tara Abraham, University of Guelph

Neurohistology and the ‘Radical’ Surgical Treatment of Epilepsy in the 1920s and 30s. Delia Gavrus, University of Winnipeg

Radical to Some Yet to Others, Ho-Hum: Adolf Meyer’s Biological Theory of Mind, 1895- 1925. Susan Lamb, University of Ottawa

The Sciences of Brain and Mind in American Medical Education: The Case of Harvard’s Medical School, 1900-1945. Tara Abraham, University of Guelph

Epigenetics as Trending Science. Michael Pettit, York University

Thursday, November 3
3:45 PM – 5:45 PM

Session 11. Collecting, Colonialism, and Material Culture in the 18th and 19th Centuries
Materials of the Mind: Phrenology and the Making of a Global Science, 1815-1920. James Poskett, University of Cambridge

Session 16. Reforming the Everyday: Scientific Expertise and its Publics
The Psycho-Technocratic Society: Psychological Expertise and Everyday Life in Progressive Era America. Jeremy Blatter, New York University

Session 19. The Fake and the False: Science, Law, and Trickery
Counterfeiting Madness: The Problem of Imposture in Nineteenth-Century Insanity Trials. Susanna Blumenthal, University of Minnesota

Friday, November 4
9:00 AM – 11:45 AM

Session 21. Binaries, Scales, and Other Modes of Classification in the Social and Life Sciences
Left, Right, Mixed, or Scaled? Dexterity Questionnaires and Genetic Theories of Handedness in Britain, 1967–1979. Tabea Cornel, University of Pennsylvania Continue reading History of Human Science Talks at HHS, Atlanta, Nov. 3-6, 2016

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FHHS Sponsored Session: “Human Science Fictionalized: A Novel, a Visual Narrative and an Indie Film”

This November’s History of Science Society (HSS) meeting features a session sponsored by HSS’s special interest group the Forum for History of Human Science (FHHS). The HSS meeting runs November 3rd through 6th in Atlanta, Georgia. The session “Human Science Fictionalized: A Novel, a Visual Narrative and an Indie Film,” organized by Ben Harris (right), will take place on the morning of Sunday November 6th. Full details follow below.

Sunday Nov. 6, 9-11 am
Session 87. Human Science Fictionalized: A Novel, a Visual Narrative and an Indie Film
Chair(s): John Carson, University of Michigan
Commentator(s): Nadine Weidman, Harvard University
Organizer(s): Ben Harris, University of New Hampshire

A Novelist’s Perspective, Andromeda Romano-Lax, Independent Scholar
An Artist’s Perspective, Matteo Farinella, Independent Scholar and Columbia University
Putting Stanley Milgram on Film, Gina Perry, University of Melbourne

Summary:

In studies of science popularization the focus is usually on non-fiction. But what about fictionalized portraits of science? This session looks at three attempts to bring the human and neuro- sciences to the public through fiction. Among the questions explored are: how is the fact/fiction boundary negotiated? how do a “fact writer” and a “fiction writer” think about popularization differently? What are the different relationships that they have to their sources, or that they envision with their audiences? Andromeda Romano-Lax is a successful novelist whose most recent work, Behave (2016), dramatizes the life and career of Rosalie Rayner, wife and former student of behaviorist John Watson. Matteo Farinella is an illustrator and artist with a doctorate in neuroscience. His visual narrative, Neurocomic (2013, co-authored with Hana Roz), portrays the history of neuroscience through a young man’s a voyage of discovery in a land of giant neurons and encounters with famous scientists. Gina Perry is an Australian journalist who used her investigative and narrative skills to write a Behind the Shock Machine (2013), a history of Stanley Milgram’s obedience studies. Now a doctoral student in psychology, she will review Experimenter, Michael Almereyda’s 2016 film about Milgram and his work. Our commentator is Nadine Weidman, a historian of science at Harvard University known for her work on public controversy and popularization in the twentieth century human sciences. Our Chair is John Carson, a historian at the University of Michigan and Director of Undergraduate Studies for its Program in Science, Technology, and Society.

Come back tomorrow for a roundup of all the history of human science related programming at HSS!

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“I’ve been to Dwight” 2016

51obiAJOTML._SX329_BO1,204,203,200_Lancaster University, the Alcohol and Drugs History Society, and the Wellcome Trust have organized a conference in Dwight, Illinois for “transnational perspectives addiction, temperance, and treatment in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.”

The “I’ve been to Dwight” meeting (July 14-17), is being held at the home of the Keeley Company, the history of which serves as a unique lens to approach the topic:

Though nearly forgotten today, the Keeley Company, based in Dwight, Illinois, distributed its “gold cure” for the alcohol, tobacco and drug habits by post and from franchised clinics across North America, Europe and Australia between 1880 and 1966. The company’s popular, international success ensured that its founder, Dr. Leslie E. Keeley, was among the world’s most famous physicians at the turn of the twentieth century. Keeley however, faced constant accusations of quackery from the forces of professional biomedicine, particularly the BMA and the AMA. Nonetheless, tens of thousands of satisfied patients from around the globe were convinced that his “gold cure” had rid them of their alcohol and drug habits and “I’ve Been to Dwight” was a catchphrase they used to explain their sobriety. After Keeley’s death in 1900, the company worked to conform to shifting standards of biomedical practice, but competition from state-run sanitaria led to its closure in 1966.

Because of its global presence, its difficult relationship with the medical mainstream and its tenacious popularity among ordinary people, marking the closure of the Keeley Company begs many historical questions and it urges us to answer them in broadly critical, comparative and/or transnational terms.

The keynote speaker will be Dr. Sarah Tracy, historian of medicine from the Department of the History of Science at the University of Oklahoma.

The conference program can be found here.

The village of Dwight, Illinois is directly in between Chicago and Bloomington, and is a short train ride from the city.

Some further online resources about the Keeley Cure:

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April 2016: “The Future of the History of the Human Sciences”

To mark the end of James Good‘s time as editor of History of the Human Sciences a special two-day meeting on “The Future of the History of the Human Sciences” is planned for April 7th and 8th, 2016. The meeting, hosted jointly by Chris Renwick and History of the Human Scienceswill take place at the University of York and feature as speakers: Roger Smith, Steve Fuller, Peter Mandler, Marianne Sommer, Amanda Rees, Michael Finn, Elizabeth Toon, Jessica Hendy, Maurizio Meloni, Des Fitzgerald, Alexandra Bacopoulos Viau, and Jonna Brenninkmeijer. Full details about the meeting, including (free) registration and postgraduate bursary information, follow below.

The Future of the History of the Human Sciences
University of York
Thursday 7th & Friday 8th April 2016

This two-day meeting, hosted jointly by Dr Chris Renwick and History of the Human Sciences, gathers together established scholars and early-career researchers to consider changes wrought in the broad interdisciplinary field of the history of the human sciences by new developments in the medical humanities, biological sciences, and literary/cultural theory. Marking the end of James Good’s 15-year tenure as HHS editor and the beginning of a new editorial team, comprising Dr Felicity Callard, Dr Rhodri Hayward, and Dr Angus Nicholls, the meeting will survey the field’s development since the foundation of HHS almost 20 years ago, and offer provocations – from various disciplinary perspectives – about the directions that it might take in the future.

Speakers include Roger Smith, Steve Fuller, Peter Mandler, Marianne Sommer, Amanda Rees, Michael Finn, Elizabeth Toon, Jessica Hendy, Maurizio Meloni, Des Fitzgerald, Alexandra Bacopoulos Viau, and Jonna Brenninkmeijer.

There will be four intensive sessions:

  1. The Problem of the Archive: biological data, digital media, material culture, and their impact upon the archive and human nature;
  2. The Problem of the Human: how the neurosciences are challenging conventional approaches to history;
  3. The Problem of the Social: How do models of ‘the social’ in the life sciences challenge those in the social sciences and humanities?
  4. Practice in the Human Sciences: new methods and approaches in medical humanities and science studies.

These sessions will be followed by a roundtable in which the outgoing and incoming History of the Human Sciences editors, plus speakers from the conference, discuss the state of the field and its future. Continue reading April 2016: “The Future of the History of the Human Sciences”

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Deadline Extended for Joint ESHHS & Cheiron Meeting Submissions

The deadline for submissions to the 2016 joint meeting of ESHHS & Cheiron has been extended to January 25th, 2016. The full call for papers follows below. More details on the meeting can be found here.

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

ESHHS and CHEIRON invite submissions to their joint conference to be held from June 27 to July 1, 2016, at the Centre for History of Science (CEHIC), Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona.

Sessions, papers, workshops, round-tables and posters may deal with any aspect of the history of the human, behavioural or social sciences. However, this year’s conference will devote particular interest in topics such as:

  • historiography
  • history and philosophy of science
  • popularization of science and the role of experts in modern society
  • the circulation of science and technology in the European periphery

Submissions: must be received by January 25, 2016 (there will no more changes of the date from now on). Please send your proposal electronically as attachment in MSWord (.doc/.docx) to the three members of the programme committee:

Ø  Ingrid Farreras (farreras@hood.edu)

Ø  Sharman Levinson (slevinson.eshhs@gmail.com)

Ø  Annette Mülberger (annette.mulberger@uab.cat)

Only original papers should be sent. Please indicate the submission type (session, paper, poster, workshop or round-table proposal). Any submission must include the name, email, and institutional address of the author.

Papers: send a 500-600 word abstract in English plus short bibliography. In case your communication will be in another language, please inform the committee in order to assist in planning linguistic support, if necessary. 

Posters: send a 300 word abstract.

Session, workshop or round-table: send a 500-600 word rationale of the event (plus short bibliography) as well as a short abstract for each paper or intervention.

Notification of acceptance will be sent by February 29, 2016.

A limited number of travel stipends will be available to students or scholars who present a paper or a poster and need economic support. Please indicate along with your submission if you wish to be considered for this arrangement.

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2nd CfP: Joint Meeting ESHHS & Cheiron, Barcelona 2016

SECOND CALL FOR ABSTRACTS
JOINT MEETING
ESHHS (European Society for the History of Human Sciences)
&
CHEIRON (International Society for the History of Behavioural and Social Sciences)
Barcelona, Spain, June 27-July 1, 2016

ESHHS and CHEIRON invite submissions to their joint conference to be held from June 27 to July 1, 2016, at the Centre for History of Science (CEHIC), Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona.

Sessions, papers, workshops, round-tables and posters may deal with any aspect of the history of the human, behavioural or social sciences. However, this year’s conference will devote particular interest in topics such as:

  • historiography
  • history and philosophy of science
  • popularization of science and the role of experts in modern society
  • the circulation of science and technology in the European periphery

Submissions: must be received by January 15, 2016. Please send your proposal electronically as attachment in MSWord (.doc/.docx) to the three members of the programme committee:

Ø  Ingrid Farreras (farreras@hood.edu)

Ø  Sharman Levinson (slevinson.eshhs@gmail.com)

Ø  Annette Mülberger (annette.mulberger@uab.cat)

Only original papers should be sent. Please indicate the submission type (session, paper, poster, workshop or round-table proposal). Any submission must include the name, email, and institutional address of the author. 

Papers: send a 500-600 word abstract in English plus short bibliography. In case your communication will be in another language, please inform the committee in order to assist in planning linguistic support, if necessary.

Posters: send a 300 word abstract.

Session, workshop or round-table: send a 500-600 word rationale of the event (plus short bibliography) as well as a short abstract for each paper or intervention.

Notification of acceptance will be sent by February 29, 2016.

Information about the Registration Fee

ESHHS/CHEIRON members non-members
Early bird registration (beforeApril 15) 100 € 130 €
late registration 200 €
Student fee 50 € 100 €

Note: The registration is not yet open (we will announce when it starts – probably in February, 2016 – and send information about how to make the transference). Please take into account that the registration fee does not include the conference dinner, which is optional and will suppose an extra cost of approximately 50 or 60 €.

Accommodation: please keep in mind that Barcelona is a touristic place and June high season. Therefore, if you want to stay in the city we recommend you to book your hotel or apartment as soon as possible. The conference itself will take place in Bellaterra (the campus of the Univ. Autònoma), about 20 km away.  From the campus you can get to the centre of the city by train, which takes about 35 minutes (but the train does not circulate during the night).

Here are some recommendations:

A) For the hotel on the campus of the UAB (“Hotel Campus”) we have a special offer: a single room for 60 euros and a double room for 66 euros. If you are interested please send us an e-mail. As soon as we receive your response we make a pre-reservation (which can be cancelled or changed by you at any time until April 2016). Later on (in January/February) when you probably will start to make travel plans we will send you a booking form to fill out to formalize the reservation (in it you will have to indicate the date of arrival and departure).

  1. B) A (cheaper) option is to rent an apartment for 2 persons (called “Vila 2“) on the university campus of the UAB. The price per week is 377€. The apartment includes private bathroom and equipped kitchen. The price also includes a weekly cleaning service. Please take a look at the link below to see the pictures. Please contact us if you are interested in this option.
    For more information see: http://www.uab.cat/web/your-home/type-q-for-1-or-2-persons-1248300550667.html

(Note: there are 3 restaurants linked to the Hotel Campus and the cafeteria opens all days from 8 a.m. to 12a.m. (midnight)).

  1. C) In the city centre: in general hotels in the city centre are more expensive and we have no chance of getting a special price. There are plenty possibilities and maybe use com to get a good cancellation policy. An attractive option could be also the “Residència d’Investigadors” (a hotel for scholars near the Ramblas, about 15 minutes walk to the train station to UAB/Bellaterra; the travel to the conference from there would take about 1 hour aprox.). The price for an individual room is 71€, the double room costs between 88€ and 100€. More information at:
    http://www.residencia-investigadors.es/ca/espacios/allotjament-9.htmPlease note that a limited number of travel stipends will be available to students or scholars who present a paper or a poster and need economic support. Please indicate along with your submission if you wish to be considered for this arrangement.

In case you want a list of hotels of the city centre or if you plan to stay on the campus please contact us(eshhs2016@gmail.com).

Kind regards,
The organisers

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CfP: “Alcohol Flows Across Cultures: Drinking Cultures in Transnational & Comparative Perspective”

A call for papers has been issued for a research symposium on alcohol consumption across cultures that will take place at St. Anne’s College, Oxford at the end of June, 2016. Full details follow below.

Alcohol flows across cultures: Drinking cultures in transnational and comparative perspective

Wednesday 29 June 2016 – Thursday 30 June 2016
Location: St Anne’s College, Oxford

Details

International Research Symposium

Alcohol consumption is currently seen as a major public health hazard across the globe. The medicalisation of alcohol use has become a prominent discourse that guides policy makers and impacts public perceptions of alcohol and drinking. This symposium intends to map the historical and cultural dimension of these phenomena and to trace the development of changing attitudes to consumption and historical and contemporary representations of alcohol and drinking in different regions, from the pre-modern to the postcolonial period. Emphasis is on the connected histories of different regions and populations across the globe in terms of their consumption patterns, government policies, economics and representations of alcohol and drinking. This transnational perspective facilitates an understanding of the local, transnational and global factors that have had a bearing on alcohol consumption and legislation and on the emergence of particular styles of ‘drinking cultures’. A comparative approach helps identify similarities, differences and crossovers between particular regions and pinpoint the parameters that shape alcohol consumption, policies and perceptions. The exploration of plural drinking cultures within any one particular region, their association with particular social groups, and their continuities and changes in the wake of wider global, colonial and postcolonial economic, political and social constraints and exchanges will be important dimensions of analysis.

Compensation for travel expenditure and local hospitality during the conference is aimed at but cannot be guaranteed. The closing date for abstracts (300 words) is 10 January 2016. Please indicate the primary source base of your contribution in your abstract, and clearly state your research questions, aims and arguments.

Contact for submission of abstracts and for inquiries:
Professor Waltraud Ernst, wernst@brookes.ac.uk
Professor David Foxcroft, david.foxcroft@brookes.ac.uk

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