Category Archives: Anniversaries

Call for papers for a Special Thematic Section of the Revista de Psicología

Call for papers for a Special Thematic Section of the Revista de Psicología

Research in History of Psychology: Celebration of the Seventieth Anniversary of the Teaching of Psychology at the University of Chile (1947-2017)

Psychology in Latin America in general, and in Chile in particular, goes through a historically significant moment, several years since the installation of the first programs of undergraduate training in Psychology in the region have passed, since the beginnings at the middle of the 20th century. Precisely, the anniversary of the creation of the first undergraduate program to train psychologists in Chile, in 1947 at the Universidad de Chile, led to the organization of a special section on Research in History of Psychology that can reflect the meaningful historical path of Psychology as a science and profession, in Latin America and the world.

In the last decades, the field of history of psychology became an area of growing professionalization worldwide, with a large number of active researchers, several research lines, celebration of special events, the creation of specific societies, the organization of historic archives and museums, edition and publication of thematic books, among others. The editors of Revista de Psicología (ISSN 0719-0581, http://revistapsicologia.uchile.cl/) believes that it is important to give visibility to the projects in History of Psychology, so necessary to critically evaluate the past of the discipline and analyze the constitutive elements of the professional identity of psychologists. That said, we invites researchers and professionals interested in historical issues to submit their contributions to the special section.

This is a call for papers reporting historiographical studies from the “Psi Disciplines” (Psychology, Psychiatry, Psychoanalysis, and others) and “Behavioral Sciences” (Neuropsychology, Psychobiology, Neurosciences, and others). We hope to receive contributions that highlight the management of primary sources and that include a proper methodological treatment to various historical subjects. Papers received will be subjected to all regular evaluation mechanisms of the journal, which will involve specialized reviewers.

Guest Editors

Vanetza E. Quezada (Universidad de Chile, Chile)
Miguel Gallegos (Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Argentina)
Rodrigo Lopes Miranda (Universidade Católica Dom Bosco, Brasil)

Deadline:  September 1st, 2017. Submissions should be send to: revista.psicologia@facso.cl

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130th Anniversary of The American Journal of Psychology

Psychological Laboratory, Cornell University,1900

The first issue of the 130th volume of The American Journal of Psychology includes a couple articles marking the occasion. Full details below.

“The Synthetic Experiment: E. B. Titchener’s Cornell Psychological Laboratory and the Test of Introspective Analysis,” by Rand B. Evans. The abstract reads,

Beginning in 1900, a major thread of research was added to E. B. Titchener’s Cornell laboratory: the synthetic experiment. Titchener and his graduate students used introspective analysis to reduce a perception, a complex experience, into its simple sensory constituents. To test the validity of that analysis, stimulus patterns were selected to reproduce the patterns of sensations found in the introspective analyses. If the original perception can be reconstructed in this way, then the analysis was considered validated. This article reviews development of the synthetic method in E. B. Titchener’s laboratory at Cornell University and examines its impact on psychological research.

“The Method of Negative Instruction: Herbert S. Langfeld’s and Ludwig R. Geissler’s 1910–1913 Insightful Studies,” by Robert W. Proctor and Aiping Xiong. The abstract reads,

Herbert S. Langfeld and Ludwig R. Geissler published insightful articles during the period of 1910–1913 using what they called the Method of Negative Instruction, which anticipated much current research on action control and the role of instructions. We review their studies and relate the findings to contemporary research and views concerning task-irrelevant congruency effects and deception, concluding that their work has not received the credit it warrants. We also call for contemporary researchers to revisit prior studies, especially ones conducted before the cognitive revolution in psychology, to enrich their knowledge of the field and improve the quality of their research.

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