All posts by Jacy Young

About Jacy Young

Jacy Young is a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) of Canada Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Surrey in the UK. She completed her doctorate in the History and Theory of Psychology at York University in 2014.

CfP: Joint BPS HPP Section & UK Critical Psychiatry Network Conference

The British Psychological Society‘s History & Philosophy of Psychology Section, together with the UK Critical Psychiatry Network, has issued a call for submissions to their Annual Conference. The conference will take place at Leeds Trinity University March 22nd and 23rd, 2016. Paper submissions are due December 18th 2015 and poster submissions January 17th 2016. The full call for papers follows below.

The British Psychological Society’s History & Philosophy of Psychology Section in collaboration with the UK Critical Psychiatry Network invites submissions for its 2016 Annual Conference to be held at Leeds Trinity University 22nd-23rd March.

The theme of the conference is the history of mental health, with keynote addresses from Professor Gail Hornstein (Mount Holyoke College, Massachusetts) and Dr. Joanna Moncrieff (University College London). Papers are invited in related areas such as clinical psychology, psychiatry, service users, resistances to psychiatry, critical perspectives and interventions.

Who is the Conference intended for?
Academics (psychology, philosophy, medicine, history, sociology), clinicians (mental health), mental health service users/carers, postgraduate students.

The conference is open to independent and professional scholars in all relevant fields, not just Section or British Psychological Society members.

Submissions

Oral and Poster Submissions will be invited for this Conference. Individual papers or symposia in any area dealing with conceptual and historical issues in Psychology, broadly defined, are invited. We particularly welcome submissions in related areas to the theme of the conference, such as clinical psychology, psychiatry, service users, resistances to psychiatry, critical perspectives and interventions.

Bursaries

Four bursaries are available to those working with mental health charitable organisations, service user groups or carers’ groups. If you wish to apply for a bursary please contact Dr. Alison Torn on a.torn@leedstrinity.ac.uk

Location:

Leeds Trinity University
Brownberrie Lane
Horsforth
Leeds
West Yorkshire
LS18 5HD

Dates:
22/03/2016 – 09:3023/03/2016 – 16:30
Contact Information:

This event is organised by the British Psychological Society and administered by
KC Jones conference&events Ltd, Tel: +44 (0)1332 224507
Email: bps@kc-jones.co.uk
www.kc-jones.co.uk/history2016

Submissions are invited for the History and Philosophy of Psychology Annual Conference 2016.

If you are interested in presenting an oral presentation at the conference then please make your submission by 16:00 Friday 18th December 2015.

If you are interested in presenting a poster at the conference then please make your submission by 23:59 Sunday 17th January 2016.

Further submission guidelines can be found here.

All presenters are expected to register and pay in advance at the appropriate rate.

If you have any queries whilst making your submission please contact us via the event hotline on 01332 224507.

Continue reading CfP: Joint BPS HPP Section & UK Critical Psychiatry Network Conference

Share on Facebook

“Associationism Without Associative Links: Thomas Brown and the Associationist Project”

AHP readers may be interested in a forthcoming article in Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A. The article, now available online, explores Scottish philosopher Thomas Brown’s associationism and recasts the associationist tradition in psychology. Full details follow below.

“Associationism without associative links: Thomas Brown and the associationist project,” by Mike Dacey. The abstract reads,

There are two roles that association played in 18th–19th century associationism. The first dominates modern understanding of the history of the concept: association is a causal link posited to explain why ideas come in the sequence they do. The second has been ignored: association is merely regularity in the trains of thought, and the target of explanation. The view of association as regularity arose in several forms throughout the tradition, but Thomas Brown (1778–1820) makes the distinction explicit. He argues that there is no associative link, and association is mere sequence. I trace this view of association through the tradition, and consider its implications: Brown’s views, in particular, motivate a rethinking of the associationist tradition in psychology. Associationism was a project united by a shared explanandum phenomenon, rather than a theory united by a shared theoretical posit.

Share on Facebook

The Role of Heredity in George Combe’s Phrenological Work

The September issue of The British Journal for the History of Science includes a piece that may be of interest to AHP readers: “Phrenology, heredity and progress in George Combe’s Constitution of Man” by Bill Jenkins.  The abstract follows below.

The Constitution of Man by George Combe (1828) was probably the most influential phrenological work of the nineteenth century. It not only offered an exposition of the phrenological theory of the mind, but also presented Combe’s vision of universal human progress through the inheritance of acquired mental attributes. In the decades before the publication of Darwin’s Origin of Species, the Constitution was probably the single most important vehicle for the dissemination of naturalistic progressivism in the English-speaking world. Although there is a significant literature on the social and cultural context of phrenology, the role of heredity in Combe’s thought has been less thoroughly explored, although both John van Wyhe and Victor L. Hilts have linked Combe’s views on heredity with the transformist theories of Jean-Baptiste Lamarck. In this paper I examine the origin, nature and significance of his ideas and argue that Combe’s hereditarianism was not directly related to Lamarckian transformism but formed part of a wider discourse on heredity in the early nineteenth century.

Share on Facebook

Hermann Helmholtz’s Graphical Recordings of the Speed of Nervous Stimulations

The September issue of Science in Context includes an article by Henning Schmidgen as part of a topical section on “Surfaces in the History of Modern Science: Inscribing, Separating, Enclosing.” In his piece Schmidgen explores the importance of Hermann Helmholtz’s graphic recordings of the speed of nerve transmissions. Full details follow below.

“Leviathan and the Myograph: Hermann Helmholtz’s “Second Note” on the Propagation Speed of Nervous Stimulations,” by Henning Schmidgen. The abstract reads,

In the winter of 1849–1850 in Königsberg, German physiologist Hermann von Helmholtz (1821–1894) conducted pioneering measurements concerning the propagation speed of stimulations in the living nerve. While recent historians of science have paid considerable attention to Helmholtz’s uses of the graphic method, in particular his construction of an instrument called “myographion,” this paper draws attention to the inscription surfaces that he used in effective ways for capturing and transmitting his findings. Against the background of recent archival findings, I show that Helmholtz used isinglass copies of his graphical recordings in order to communicate the basic principle of previous measurements to the academic public. As the correspondence with his Berlin-based friend and colleague Emil du Bois-Reymond (1818–1896) and the subsequent development of the myographion make clear, these curves were not meant as measurements but functioned as demonstrations. In other words, Helmholtz’s curves did provide “images of precision” (Olesko and Holmes 1993) – but they were not precise images.

Share on Facebook

Sad News, the Passing of Elizabeth Scarborough

scarboroough cheiron
L-R: Barbara Lusk, Christopher Green, Elizabeth Scarborough, and Larry Stern at Cheiron in Lawrence, KS, June 2015. Photograph courtesy of Barbara Lusk.

We are sad to report that Elizabeth Scarborough has passed away. Scarborough’s work on the history of women in psychology, together with collaborator Laurel Furumoto, was groundbreaking. Their book Untold Lives: The First Generation of American Women Psychologists remains a classic. A founding member of Cheiron, she was a fixture at the society’s annual meetings, never missing a year, including the most recent gathering in Lawrence, Kansas this past June. A towering figure in the field, Elizabeth was warm and welcoming to newcomers. She will be sorely missed.

Update: An official obituary for Elizabeth Scarborough is now available online.

Share on Facebook

Help Save Wilhelm Wundt House!

Professors Hans Strasburger and Gerd Jüttemann are spearheading an effort to save Wilhelm Wundt’s house near Leipzig. You can contribute funds to the crowdfunding effort, or simply offer your support, here. Full details follow below.

Dear colleagues,

Wilhelm Wundt (1832–1920), as is well known, pursued his historically outstanding work at the University of Leipzig and it could be said that he counts as the most distinguished founder of Psychology. He not only built the world’s first laboratory of experimental psychology in Leipzig but also developed a theory of conscious experience that was underpinned by the method of introspection. Wundt wrote influential books on many aspects of psychology and he was a champion of investigating psychological processes by means of experiment.  He further initiated a culture-historically oriented developmental psychology, for which he coined the – now obsolete – term “folk psychology”.

The houses in Leipzig where Wundt lived were destroyed in the Second World War. His last residence, in Großbothen near Leipzig, has been preserved, however. Wilhelm Ostwald (1853–1932), the Nobel Prize winner for chemistry with whom Wundt was close friends, lived across the street; there is a well-kept memorial site there for Ostwald that is quite popular. Wundt’s building was constructed in the style of its time (see photo). It is no longer in the possession of Wundt’s descendants and was uninhabited for quite some time. Though it is heritage-protected, its current owner has no interest in its preservation and would be willing to sell it at a reasonable price. High renovation costs would arise in case of its acquisition but at the same time the German Foundation for the Maintenance of Historical Monuments (Deutsche Stiftung für Denkmalschutz) has signaled that it would generously support such a project. There already exists the “Wilhelm Wundt Room” at Leipzig’s Department of Psychology and the Adolf-Würth Center for the History of Psychology in Würzburg. Yet it would be desirable if there were a place where we could commemorate the person behind all these achievements, to inspire future generations, and Wundt’s house in Großbothen could be a possible location for it.

So to save the Wundt house we are considering initiating crowd funding. As you are probably aware, donations by that method are initially virtual. Only if the number of backers and prospective sums appear sufficient for realizing the project would those who have participated be asked whether, indeed, they would be willing to donate the prospective amount.

Please use the following link:
http://www.hans.strasburger.de/wundt_house_project.html

Share on Facebook

Special Issue: “Feminism and/in/as Psychology: The Public Sciences of Sex and Gender”

Feminists form Division 35 of the American Psychological Association in 1973, now the Society for the Psychology of Women.

The August issue of History of Psychology is now online. Guest edited by Alexandra Rutherford and Michael Pettit, this special issue explores “Feminism and/in/as psychology: The public sciences of sex and gender.” As Rutherford and Pettit write in their abstract,

In our introduction to this special issue on the histories of feminism, gender, sexuality, and the psy-disciplines, we propose the tripartite framework of “feminism and/in/as psychology” to conceptualize the dynamics of their conjoined trajectories and relationship to gender and sexuality from the late 19th through the late 20th centuries. “Feminism and psychology” highlights the tensions between a political movement and a scientific discipline and the efforts of participants in each to problematize the other. “Feminism in psychology” refers to those historical moments when self-identified feminists intervened in psychology to alter its content, methodologies, and populations. We propose, as have others, that these interventions predate the 1970s, the period most commonly associated with the “founding” of feminist psychology. Finally, “feminism as psychology/psychology as feminism” explores the shared ground between psychology and feminism—the conceptual, methodological, and (more rarely) epistemological moments when psychology and feminism made common cause. We suggest that the traffic between feminism and psychology has been persistent, continuous, and productive, despite taking different historically and geographically contingent forms.

Full titles, authors, and abstracts for articles in this special issue follow below.

“The personal is scientific: Women, gender, and the production of sexological knowledge in Germany and Austria, 1900–1931,” Kirsten Leng. The abstract reads, Continue reading Special Issue: “Feminism and/in/as Psychology: The Public Sciences of Sex and Gender”

Share on Facebook

New History of Psychiatry: Possession in the DSM, Jung’s Seances, & More

The September 2015 issue of History of Psychiatry is now online.  Among the articles in this issue are ones on Carl Jung (above) and his investigation of his cousin’s mediumship, the epistemological problems of incorporating possession into the DSM, a case study of a museum of mental health care history, and much more. Full titles, authors, and abstract follow below.

“The epistemological significance of possession entering the DSM,” by Craig Stephenson. The abstract reads,

The discourse of the American Psychiatric Association’s DSM reflects the inherently dialogic or contradictory nature of its stated mandate to demonstrate both ‘nosological completeness’ and cultural ‘inclusiveness’. Psychiatry employs the dialogic discourse of the DSM in a one-sided, positivistic manner by identifying what it considers universal mental disease entities stripped of their cultural context. In 1992 the editors of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders proposed to introduce possession into their revisions. A survey of the discussions about introducing ‘possession’ as a dissociative disorder to be listed in the DSM-IV indicates a missed epistemological break. Subsequently the editors of the DSM-5 politically ‘recuperated’ possession into its official discourse, without acknowledging the anarchic challenges that possession presents to psychiatry as a cultural practice.

“‘A vehicle of symbols and nothing more’. George Romanes, theory of mind, information, and Samuel Butler,” by Donald R Forsdyke. The abstract reads, Continue reading New History of Psychiatry: Possession in the DSM, Jung’s Seances, & More

Share on Facebook

BBC Radio4’s Mind Changers: “Carl Rogers and the Person-Centred Approach”

The most recent episode of BBC Radio 4’s Mind Changers programme explores “Carl Rogers and the Person-Centred Approach.” As described on the BBC site,

Claudia Hammond presents the history of psychology series which examines the work of the people who have changed our understanding of the human mind. This week she explores Carl Rogers’ revolutionary approach to psychotherapy, led by the client and not the therapist. His influence can be seen throughout the field today.

Claudia meets Rogers’ daughter, Natalie Rogers, who has followed in her father’s footsteps and developed Expressive Arts Person-Centred Therapy, and hears more about the man from Maureen O’Hara of the National University at La Jolla, who worked with him. Richard McNally of Harvard University and Shirley Reynolds of Surrey University explain how far Rogers’ influence extends today, and Claudia sees this for herself in a consulting room in downtown San Francisco, where she meets Person-Centred psychotherapist, Nina Utigaard.

The full episode can be heard online here.

 

Share on Facebook

Call for Papers: 2016 Joint ESHHS/Cheiron Meeting in Barcelona

The first call for papers for the 2016 joint meeting of ESHHS (European Society for the History of Human Sciences) & Cheiron (International Society for the History of Behavioural and Social Sciences) has been issued. The meeting will take place in Barcelona, Spain, June 27-July 1, 2016. The full call for papers follows below and can also be found here.

ESHHS and CHEIRON invite submissions to their joint conference to be held from June 27 to July 1, 2016, at the Centre for History of Science (CEHIC), Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona.

Sessions, papers, workshops, round-tables and posters may deal with any aspect of the history of the human, behavioural or social sciences. However, this year’s conference will devote particular interest in topics such as:

historiography
history and philosophy of science
popularization of science and the role of experts in modern society
the circulation of science and technology in the European periphery

Submissions: must be received by January 15, 2016. Please send your proposal electronically as attachment in MSWord (.doc/.docx) to the three members of the programme committee:

Ingrid Farreras (farreras@hood.edu)
Sharman Levinson (slevinson.eshhs@gmail.com)
Annette Mülberger (annette.mulberger@uab.cat)

Only original papers should be sent. Please indicate the submission type (session, paper, poster, workshop or round-table proposal). Any submission must include the name, email, and institutional address of the author.
Papers: send a 500-600 word abstract in English plus short bibliography. In case your communication will be in another language, please inform the committee in order to assist in planning linguistic support, if necessary.
Posters: send a 300 word abstract.
Session, workshop or round-table: send a 500-600 word rationale of the event (plus short bibliography) as well as a short abstract for each paper or intervention.

Notification of acceptance will be sent by February 29, 2016.

A limited number of travel stipends will be available to students or scholars who present a paper or a poster and need economic support. Please indicate along with your submission if you wish to be considered for this arrangement. For updates on the conference, check any of the following websites www.eshhs.eu, www.uakron.edu/cheiron/ or www.cehic.es.

Organization: Annette Mülberger, Mònica Balltondre, Mariagrazia Proietto, Thomas Sturm, Jorge Molero, Carlos Tabernero, Oscar Montero Pich, Sergi Mora, Lara Scaglia, Sónia Recuerda, Vanessa Márquez, Patricia Torres, Aina Elias y Arthur Arruda Leal Ferreira. E-mail: eshhs2016@gmail.com

The local organizing committee welcomes you to Barcelona!

Share on Facebook